nevver:

Loch Ness, April 19, 1934

This is a swimming elephant.

nevver:

Loch Ness, April 19, 1934

This is a swimming elephant.

Roman Road truck.

Roman Road truck.

Dumpster decorating. Dr. Strangelove came up coincidentally in my reading several times this week so it’s pure kismet that I find this in the dumpster today.

Dumpster decorating. Dr. Strangelove came up coincidentally in my reading several times this week so it’s pure kismet that I find this in the dumpster today.

Went to see Russell Brand’s “presentation” on Revolution yesterday. He comes off as a dangerous pied piper.

Went to see Russell Brand’s “presentation” on Revolution yesterday. He comes off as a dangerous pied piper.

joffreybieber:

Fan submission (courtesy of truthrejectssimplicity)

joffreybieber:

Fan submission (courtesy of truthrejectssimplicity)

vimeo:

Meet Theo. He’s 10, he’s visually impaired and he hates it when people are too nice to him. International Emmy Award-Winner, BAFTA Nominated.

mapsontheweb:

London’s protected views and their limits on skyscrapers

mapsontheweb:

London’s protected views and their limits on skyscrapers

kqedscience:

The geology of Game of Thrones
"We pieced this geologic history together from character observations, town names, official Game of Thrones maps, and the principles of geology learned here on Earth.  Using only limited data we were able to reimagine 500 million years of planetary evolution, including volcanoes, continents rising from the oceans, and ice ages (with guest appearance by white walkers and dragons)."
(via Generation Anthropocene)
Note: One of our former KQED Science fellows, Mike Osborne, is the creator of this cool podcast!


Somebody beat me to it.

kqedscience:

The geology of Game of Thrones

"We pieced this geologic history together from character observations, town names, official Game of Thrones maps, and the principles of geology learned here on Earth.  Using only limited data we were able to reimagine 500 million years of planetary evolution, including volcanoes, continents rising from the oceans, and ice ages (with guest appearance by white walkers and dragons)."

(via Generation Anthropocene)

Note: One of our former KQED Science fellows, Mike Osborne, is the creator of this cool podcast!

Somebody beat me to it.

markmcevoy:

History